S&Y Handicrafts factory

Room 611,Guaner’Yongtai Building,Congyun Road,

Yuanxia tian,Baiyun district,Guangzhou,China

Tel:86-20-86000438

Fax:86-20-88551378

Email:daniel@syhandicrafts.com

 

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Home > Telephone booth of London

The first telephone booth was probably located near the Staple Inn in High Holborn in London, England, in May of 1903.[3] It was operated and located by the Grand Central Railway. However, some sources claim that there was a telephone box called "Fernsprechkiosk" in Berlin in 1881.

A telephone booth, telephone kiosk, telephone call box or telephone box is a small structure furnished with a payphone and designed for a telephone user's convenience. In the USA and Canada, "telephone booth" is used, while in the United Kingdom, Australia and the rest of the Commonwealth of Nations it is a "telephone box" or "phone box".[1] Such a booth usually has lighting, a door to provide privacy and windows to let others know if the booth is in use. The booth may be furnished with a printed directory of local telephone numbers, and a booth in a formal setting, such as a hotel, may be furnished with paper and pen and even a seat. An outdoor booth may be made of metal and plastic to withstand the elements and heavy use, while an indoor booth (once known as a silence cabinet) may have more elaborate architecture and furnishings.[2] Most outdoor booths feature the name and logo of the telephone service provider.

 

Starting in the 1970s pay telephones were less and less commonly placed in booths in the United States. In many areas where they were once common, telephone booths have now been almost completely replaced by non-enclosed pay phones. In the United States, this replacement was caused, at least in part, by an attempt to make the pay telephones more accessible to disabled people. However, in the United Kingdom, telephones remained in booths more often than the non-enclosed set up. Although still fairly common, the number of phone boxes has declined sharply in Britain since the late 1990s due to the boom of mobile phones.

Many locations that provide pay-phones mount the phones on kiosks rather than in booths — this relative lack of privacy and comfort discourages lengthy calls in high-demand areas such as airports.

Special equipment installed in some telephone booths allows a caller to use a computer, a portable fax machine, or a telecommunications device for the deaf.